Tell Us Your Tales From the Road

safe driving tips

Have you ever seen a deer leap out from the darkness and over your hood? Or experienced glare so blinding you didn’t know what to do? Maybe a frozen windshield made you late for work more than a couple times? (We’ve all been there).

Cars and driving can be unpredictable, but there’s something to learn from each of these moments.

Tell us your tales from the road – the good, the scary and the embarrassing. Your story could help other drivers facing similar situations.

Tell Us Your Tales From the Road

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Member Stories

We were traveling south to Florida from Rhode Island and stopped in Charleston for an overnight stay. The next morning, on our back out to Route 95, we hit a deer in the lovely little town of Walterboro, S.C. We were OK, but sustained significant damage to our car. Needless to say, that put a serious crimp in our trip plans and it was quite a while before we were able to continue on to Florida. I installed a deer whistle on the front end of my car to avoid another incident like that. So far it’s worked well – no deer mishaps!

William DeFusco

Pro tip: Deer are most active during dawn and dusk. Keep an eye out for “deer crossing” signs, and be especially vigilant when driving through wooded areas during these times. Deer also travel in herds, so if you see one there are likely others nearby. Click here for more deer safety tips.

We took a road trip to Quebec City, and when we attempted to return home to Massachusetts, we noticed a flat tire. ‘Oh no, we’re in another country!’ Well, we called AAA, and they sent help in under 30 minutes. The mechanic from CAA fixed the flat and even gave us recommendations for places to visit in Canada. Thank you, AAA.

Steve and Pam Perretti

Pro tip: AAA Roadside Assistance is available 24/7 (even in Canada!).

I was driving to North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 2011 when I encountered fog so dense I couldn’t see more than 20 feet in front of my car. I kept one eye on my GPS so I didn’t hit any unexpected curves in the road. My other eye was watching both the road and the possibility of seeing a moose appear.

Joanne Sexton

Pro tip: When driving in fog, set your headlights to low. High beams bounce off the fog, making it even harder to see.

A few years ago, I was driving on I-95 North in the right when a tractor-trailer decided to switch from the center lane to the right lane. Unfortunately, I was in his blind spot, so he started to come over. I had to slow down and go into the breakdown lane to avoid him not hitting me. It was a miracle that the back end of the trailer missed my car’s front end. I’m sure the truck driver never had a clue we almost crashed.

Michael Amato

Pro tip: Checking your blind spot and “reading the road” are a few of the top reminders AAA Driver Training instructors have for new (and all) drivers. Learn more about AAA Driver Training.

Years ago, I was driving my Honda Odyssey and towing a small camper through northern Vermont. The road that I was on was two lanes with no breakdown lane. Enroute to my destination it began to rain, and shortly thereafter my van began to hydroplane. I wanted to pull off the road but that wasn’t an option. I slowed down to 5 mph and proceeded for several miles at that rate until the rain stopped. It was the scariest ride of my life.

Jan Berger

Pro tip: In a situation like this, stay calm, advises AAA’s Car Doctor, John Paul. Your first reaction to hydroplaning might be to brake, but try to resist the urge. Since you are literally riding on top of water, it won’t stop you. Instead, ease off the accelerator until your vehicle starts to gain traction. Click here for more tips on hydroplaning and driving in rain.

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