Your AAA Network

Food For All: Turkey 2.0

Try these inventive takes on traditional Thanksgiving classics this year.

Cream of corn soup

Cream of corn soup from Deuxwave.

(Photo: Andy Ryan)

Ah, Thanksgiving. Time to gather with family and friends, give thanks for what we have … and stuff our faces with all the traditional favorites: turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, veggies and oodles of desserts.

Why not spice up your Turkey Day table this year with a new twist on a favorite classic? Who knows – you may just start a new tradition.

Corn

No matter what form it takes – cornbread, creamed corn or just plain corn on the cob – there’s no escaping corn on Thanksgiving. How about putting it in a soup this year? Chef Chris Coombs of AAA Four Diamond Rated Deuxave, in Boston, shared his recipe for cream of corn soup. He makes his own stock by letting corncobs steep in a large saucepan for 45 minutes. Add this, along with cream, to cooked corn and onions, then puree and pass through a fine mesh sieve for a silky, smooth soup.

Green Bean Casserole

Don’t spiff up green bean casserole by adding bacon or french-fried onions; use a different vegetable instead: kohlrabi. Chef Rhys Lewis from the AAA Four Diamond Rated Woodstock Inn and Resort in Woodstock, Vt., uses kohlrabi – a cousin of cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts – in a casserole- like kohlrabi pave. Lay a thin layer of shaved kohlrabi in a baking dish. Top with a layer of Parmesan cheese and a sprinkle of chopped basil. Next layer on thin sliced potatoes and repeat layers until all ingredients are used. Next, pour cream over the pave and bake until golden brown and tender.

Grandma’s Pecan Pie

Give Grandma a break from baking this year and serve these kicked-up pecans just right for nibbling. The spiced pecans made by executive chef Peter Davis at Henrietta’s Table, the restaurant at the AAA Four Diamond Rated Charles Hotel in Cambridge, Mass., are spicy and satisfying. Toast pecans, then toss with melted butter and maple syrup. Then, dust them in cumin, cayenne pepper, chili powder, cardamom, paprika and cinnamon.

Do you serve up traditional fare or spice up old recipes at your Thanksgiving table? Share in the comments.

For more recipes from AAA diamond-rated chefs, visit AAA.com/FoodForAll.

Comments
  • Lynne L.

    I am so intrigued with the corn soup. At 1st I thought negatively, like where are the precise measurements? Then I switched and considered the opportunity to experiment and play . . . like a really good grown-up cook! Play is at any age . . . and I’m going to be turning 78! Blessings!

Leave a Reply

You must log in to post a comment.


Enter Your Log In Credentials
Larger version of the image

Send this to a friend