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Top 10 Digital Workouts to Try at Home

Want to stay in shape without leaving the comfort of your home? The internet can help.

digital workouts

There’s a plethora of streamers, YouTubers and digital trainers online ready to help you through any home workout. But which one is right for you? Choosing the appropriate exercise depends on your body, skill level, available equipment and personal goals. You also want to pick something that lets you have a little fun.

Turn any room in your house into your own personal gym with these digital workouts.

Stretching

Stretching is the most important part of any workout, whether you’re stretching before your exercises to get limber or after your exercises to cool down. Stretching can help make sure that you don’t overdo it and injure yourself during your workout. It’s also one of the most accessible types of digital workouts, since it usually doesn’t require any equipment at all. It’s helpful to stretch with the guidance of a digital instructor who can tell you exactly what to do to stay safe and get flexible.

Cardio

The aim of cardio is to elevate your heart rate above your normal, resting heart rate. A lot of different workouts (some in this list) fall under the category of cardio, whether it’s aerobic or anaerobic. Aerobic cardio like walking, running, biking and dancing raises your heart rate and pumps oxygenated blood throughout your body. Anaerobic cardio like sprints, burpees and high-intensity interval training raises your heart rate as well, but the main difference is that the cardiovascular system can’t deliver oxygen to your muscles fast enough.

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Dance

Want to work out without feeling like you’re working out? Dance could be the answer. Following an online dance workout can feel like being at a party, even though you’re really staying in shape. There are many different types of dance exercises, like Zumba, Jazzercise and Bokwa, which all incorporate a high-energy tempo and choreography that’s easy for anyone to follow.

Cycling

Miss your spin class? You can take one at home! You will need equipment for this, but if you don’t have a stationary bike, you can turn any bicycle into one with specialized stands. Cycling is a great cardio exercise, and it’s made even better with the guidance of an instructor pushing you along and encouraging you to do your personal best.

Strength Training

Strength training is all about building muscle mass, endurance and (obviously) strength. There are many different types of strength training – using both weights and your own body weight. If you’re working out by yourself, you might not be able to use certain weights without a spotter, but there are many other options. Using smaller weights with increased reps can be just as beneficial to your overall health. Kettlebells are great for at-home strength training – these swinging weights are small, but mighty, and they’re a valuable addition to many exercises. Make sure to follow along with your digital instructor so that you stay safe while getting strong.

digital workout

Yoga

Want to stretch your mind as well as your body? Yoga helps to mobilize joints, calm the mind, stretch ligaments and strengthen muscles. It also doesn’t require that much equipment. If you don’t have a yoga mat at home, a carpet or beach towel will do just fine. With over 100 different schools of yoga, it’s hard to know where to start, but a digital instructor can help guide you through the poses with ease. The great thing about yoga is that no matter what your mobility level is, there’s probably a type of yoga that’s appropriate for you.

Resistance Band Exercises

Resistance band exercise is a form of strength training using large, stretchy bands and your own body weight. It’s a great way for beginners to get into strength training and working out, because the equipment is cheap, easy to store and extremely versatile. The only thing about resistance bands is that they’re not exactly intuitive. You have to be taught how to use them, which is where digital instruction comes in. You’ll be stretching out those bands and building up your muscles in no time.

High Intensity Interval Training

High Intensity Interval Training or HIIT is a form of anaerobic cardio that’s all about periods of demanding physical activity interspersed with brief rest or recovery periods. It’s challenging for just about everyone, but the frequent lower-intensity segments allow you moments to recover, breathe and get ready for the next task. It’s great for building muscle and boosting metabolism. HIIT is a great digital workout, since it works best with someone keeping you accountable and reminding you when you can slow down. Don’t go overboard right out of the gate, though. Build up from smaller periods of intensity and fewer reps.

Martial Arts

Like dance, you can easily forget you’re working out when you’re doing martial arts. The internet is full of different digital workouts to choose from, like karate, kickboxing, self-defense, judo, tai chi and so much more. Even though you’re working out from home and without a sparring partner, the martial arts are full of forms, exercises and moves that are necessary to practice on your own.

Core Training

Your core is made up of muscles located deep within your trunk, and training these muscles can help improve your strength, power and posture. Some great core exercises include crunches, planks, mountain climbers and squats. Many types of workouts include core exercises already, but if you want to focus on your core, there’s a ton of digital core workout routines filled with exercises for these specific muscles.

Looking for some digital workouts to try? AAA members can access hundreds of on-demand fitness videos and livestreams for just $25 a month with the Active&Fit Direct program. Learn more

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